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Hoof Care Hero For Barrel Racers & Why Horse Owners, Riders And Professionals Opt for it

FormaHoof – Hoof Care Hero For Barrel Racers & Why Horse Owners, Riders And Professionals Opt for it

FormaHoof provides Five Star Hoof Protection and Rehabilitation for all equines, for enhanced comfort and superior performance with many users being active barrel racer.

 

Farrier Bubba Miller and veterinarian Dr. Emily Hood, both based in Texas, are pioneers with FormaHoof in the US. Dr. Hood provides her services to many in the local Barrel Racing community and both provide helpful insights as to why FormaHoof is a great solution for Barrel Horses.

What Barrel Racers and professional FormaHoof Applicators say:


Dr. Emily Hood:

 

“Since the introduction of FormaHoof into our practice, the majority of cases we see for therapeutic application are barrel horses.

 

As the 3D application encompasses the entire foot and ‘trains’ the hoof wall for proper alignment, FormaHoof allows horses to comfortably and successfully compete throughout the rehabilitation process.

 

FormaHoof not only allows us to provide almost instant pain relief, as it allows us to drastically alter angles while protecting the soft tissue structures, but also to simultaneously re-balance the foot for strong, healthy hoof growth and increased structural integrity, further reducing the need for future corrective shoeing.”

Bubba Miller and Dr. Hood work with various clients in the Barrel community and below share details of some handpicked cases which provide insights into why they chose FormaHoof and how the horses have benefited.

Bubba Miller on Casanova’s case, where Team Work makes the Dream Work


“Casanova is an American Quarter Horse that competes at a very high level of competitive barrel racing … when sound.”

 

“I was first introduced to him as I watched him compete with Ashton Padon as his rider.

 

At that time, Dr. Hood was applying the FormaHoof application and he improved greatly.

 

His FormaHoof treatment having ended, Casanova went back to his owner – Ms. Calfee.

 

After some time she reached out to me as Casanova was no longer sound and we put him back in FormaHoof.

 

Since then, his angles, strides, soundness and attitude have all improved.”

Horse Hoof Radiography Casanova

“This is a picture of the first time I treated Casanova in December of 2020 on the left.

 

I can’t remember if he was shoed or barefoot but he wasn’t sound.

 

The radiograph on the right shows March 2021, after two sets of FormaHoof.

 

You can see an extreme change in palmar angle, sole depth, his attitude changed for the better and he is sound!”

Further he shares:

“I visited with one of his riders – Jennifer Sharp, a NFR qualifier – and asked her about how she feels competing on a horse in FormaHoof.

 

Jennifer confirmed that she feels very safe and that the horse feels sure footed as he travels in the arena.

 

As many competitive horses suffer from soundness issues that are derived from poor hoof alignment, FormaHoof is going to be a great choice to get many of these horses back to the arena.

 

I have seen horses recover from injuries and hoof diseases which, before the application of FormaHoof, it might have been questionable whether the horse would ever return to being a competitive equine athlete.”

Hoof Care and Protection James

James Commander & Texas Ta Fame – Back on track with FormaHoof


Taxas Ta Fame, AKA Tex, is an 8yo AQHA owned by James, an Emergency Room Nurse Practitioner from Oklahoma.

 

James comments “I purchased ‘Tex’ nearly a year ago from a good friend.

 

He had gotten quite the reputation for being a handful to deal with and was extremely difficult to get a clean qualifier run on or get in the arena.

 

I noticed that he would ‘ grunt’ in his turns and at first I mistook this for ‘ try and guts’, but little did I know that he was trying to work through the discomfort in his feet.”

“Tex had never taken a lame step on soft soil but was noticeably tender on firm ground.

 

After an ice storm, he bruised his feet terribly and I resorted to pads, icing them, topical hardeners etc.

 

Dr. Emily Hood led me to FormaHoof and Tex is now on his second application, is exercised at a long trot daily and is sooo sound!

 

Secondary issues like soreness he always seemed to have on his top line have also resolved.

 

Icing on the cake is that he’s winning / placing with the elite horses now!”

Credit: James Commander

Kelly Jones & Docs Rocket Dog aka Jewels – A FormaHoof fan from the early days


Kelly Jones currently lives in Texas and has been barrel racing for 51 years.

 

She is currently running Docs Rocket Dog, AKA Jewels, a 12 yo registered quarter horse and she tells Jewels’ story:

 

“I got Jewels in trade as a two year old from my Vet.

 

She has so much talent, but as she got older, her feet started falling apart.

 

She had very thin soles, no hoof wall and low heels and we tried everything to get her feet to grow, to little avail.

 

She got so bad that she would spend about 90% of her day laying down and my husband and I were thinking we may have to euthanize her.

“Then one day, my local vet, Dr. Thoni called me and asked me to bring Jewels to the clinic as he possibly had the solution.

 

At that time FormaHoof was not yet available in the United States, but the FormaHoof Team were here on a launch tour, so they travelled to Texas together with Dr. Hood, who applied FormaHoof on Jewels.

 

I just could not believe that when they were done Jewels walked off sound! It was a MIRACLE! So when I tell people that FormaHoof saved my horse’s life, I mean it!”

Barrel Racer Hoof Care
Credit: Kelly Jones

Are you in need to rebuild a hoof or want to provide best protection and comfort to your horse?


FormaHoof is the most effective solution to a wide range of hoof problems the equine world faces on a daily basis.

 

From laminitis, thin soles, low heels, and white line disease, to navicular syndrome, developmental and poor performance issues, FormaHoof offers drug-free pain relief whilst giving stability and support to allow the hoof to regenerate, naturally.

 

FormaHoof applications can be beneficial as a first-aid measure, a rehab tool or a permanent shoeing solution.

FormaHoof supports faster hoof growth, increases sole depth, adds concavity, supports and protects the hoof, realigns the correct angles of the hoof to promote blood flow and natural growth.

 

Building up a hoof after an injury or disease can be time consuming and frustrating.

 

FormaHoof allows horses to grow back into healthy hooves whilst giving the damaged hoof full protection and a clean environment.

Order a pre-configured Starter Kit and start your hoof health journey today

Subscribe to our free newsletter for the latest hoof care news and updates

Ask a FormaHoof Expert Facebook Group

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business.

 

To allow everyone a smooth start into their FormaHoof journey, we have also created a FREE FormaHoof Basics tutorial, allowing owners  to gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started (incl. how to apply/remove and more).

Contact form

Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


Transitioning Horses to Barefoot: Why and How with FormaHoof

Transitioning Horses to Barefoot: Why and How with FormaHoof

Let’s talk about natural horse hoof management and sound, barefoot horses. Afterall, barefoot is the horse’s natural state and the benefits of going barefoot can include improved circulation to the feet, enhanced traction, a better way of going, and stronger, healthier hoof growth.

 

We are often contacted by owners who consider FormaHoof as the last option for their horses; horses that are often deemed beyond hope by veterinarians and conventional farriers, horses suffering from laminitis/founder, navicular disease, severe white line disease, or other conditions, but also those that simply want to give their horses hassle-free and non-invasive hoof protection.

 

FormaHoof doesn’t need to be a forever solution, but can support horses with and without hoof problems or lameness on their way to a barefoot life.

Can a shod horse go barefoot?


To answer this question, several others must be asked, including:

 

  • What do you do with your horse?
  • How often is he/she ridden and on what kind of ground?

 

Other factors to consider are hoof health and the horse’s movement and limb position. In short, horses that are primarily ridden on soft ground or that spend their time in the field may be more suited to a barefoot life than horses that are often ridden on rough, aggressive surfaces, such as gravel and tarmac.

Why go barefoot? Is it better for horses to be barefoot than shod?


Whilst most horse owners have their horses shod to protect their feet, or even just out of habit, there is a growing global community that want to avoid nailing a traditional horseshoe onto the hoof.

 

When considering transitioning a horse to barefoot, you need to do your research and be sure that you are doing the right thing for your horse. Barefoot trimming plays a big part in good equine podiatry and although the benefits of going barefoot can vary for each horse, increased blood circulation, better movement, and better traction are experienced by most barefoot horses.

What happens to the hoof under pressure?


Veron Dryden, DVM, CJF, APF, owner of Bur Oak Veterinary and Podiatry Services in Lexington, Kentucky, in an article published in The Horse Magazine, explains that an additional physiological benefit of being barefoot is that the hoof capsule can expand naturally.

 

“With a shoe, there is some restriction of the normal expansion of the hoof capsule, depending on the type of shoe and the method of application,” he says.

 

When shod with a standard steel shoe, “the hoof capsule is restricted in those areas where the nails are placed—the further back toward the heel, the less expansion of the heel will occur.”

 

He goes on to note that clips and glue-on aluminium shoes further restrict the hoof, whereas polyurethane shoes allow for more give and hoof expansion. (source)

Consider the weight of your horse and the pressure the hoof endures at a full gallop.

 

We took the time to investigate and compare the behaviour of a horse’s hoof under 2,000kg load when the horse was barefoot, shod, and in FormaHoof, with impressive results.

 

Sign up to check the detailed explanation in our free FormaHoof Basics Tutorial and the advanced FCA course.

Transition period between shod and barefoot


Just as a human barefoot runner develops protective calluses only by walking on different surfaces, the horse’s hoof strengthens in the same way.

 

The more a hoof is protected by a shoe, the less abrasion and beneficial hardening it will experience.

 

Whilst some horses have fantastic feet by nature, others are not gifted with strong hooves and a sustainable sole to allow for an easy and hassle-free transition.

How long does transitioning a horse to barefoot take?
And how long does it take for a horse to adjust to being barefoot?


How long it takes for a horse to adjust to the new normal of being barefoot will depend on each individual horse, but most horses can adjust over 1-4 shoeing cycles.

 

The crunch point is often the sole thickness, as horses with thin soles or sensitive feet can be prone to developing abscesses during the transition period.

 

If you are considering transitioning your horse to barefoot, you should always speak to your farrier, vet, barefoot trimmer or equine podiatry specialist before you decide.

How can FormaHoof help your horse enjoy a smooth transition period?


Barefoot is the most natural way to move for a horse, but not every hoof is strong enough for the transition.

 

By recreating the form of a perfectly healthy, balanced hoof, FormaHoof’s polyurethane shoeing offers vital support during the transition period, allowing horses to recover from often “imperfect” feet or hoof related disease and grow healthy, strong hooves with thick soles.

 

FormaHoof allows the horse to spread weight over the entire foot, which can increase blood flow whilst supporting the enhanced growth of natural hoof.

With hundreds of horses across the world enjoying significantly improved hoof health over a short period of time, FormaHoof is the ideal solution when transitioning a horse to barefoot.

 

Whilst boots may protect the horse’s foot during a transition, they will not necessarily support the natural hoof growth, nor strengthen the foot and sole during this period.

 

Allowing your horses to progressively work towards strong hooves and avoiding the development of any soreness in the transition period, is the key to success.

Can barefoot horses compete?


For a long time, barefoot horses were frankly seen as ‘hippie horses’! However, the latest trends support the ‘natural hoof movement’ in the equestrian world and even top athletes are taking the step to compete their horses barefoot, as seen at the Tokyo Olympic where 2/3 of the Swedish gold medal winning show jumping team competed their horses barefoot.

 

Barefoot trimming and natural hoof care has made its way up the grades and is acknowledged and endorsed by more and more leading athletes, veterinarians, and equine podiatry specialists around the world.

Some disciplines such as turf racing require traditional shoes in their regulations.

 

FormaHoof can combine with a traditional shoe (if required), without damaging the hoof wall, as nails will go through the polyurethane and not the hoof itself.

 

FormaHoof is an approved shoeing process by the USEF, USDF, British Horse Racing Authority and many other national and international Federations.

Are you sick of lost or twisted shoes, hoof wall damage & abscesses?


We’ve seen every challenge that transitioning to barefoot may bring, but there is no need to worry, transitioning a horse to barefoot can be a smooth process.

 

Here at FormaHoof, we advocate a holistic approach, including hoof care, nutrition, exercise, and other equine rehab therapies, which we can see in the wide range of services provided by the FormaHoof Certified Applicator network, to help your horse experience the best possible transition period, for long-term soundness and strong, healthy hooves.

Subscribe to our free newsletter for the latest hoof care news and updates

Ask a FormaHoof Expert Facebook Group

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business.

To allow everyone a smooth start into their FormaHoof journey, we have also created a FREE FormaHoof Basics tutorial, allowing owners  to gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started (incl. how to apply/remove and more).

Contact form

Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


Nutrition and Care for horses and ponies with PPID (Equine Cushings)

Nutrition and Care for horses and ponies with PPID (Equine Cushings)

PPID (Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction), or ‘Cushings’ as we know it, is the most common equine hormonal disorder and is generally caused by an enlargement of the pituitary gland or a tumour affecting the pituitary gland.

 

If your horse or pony has PPID, nutrition can be pivotal to helping manage the condition throughout the year. As we move into autumn and winter, when horses and ponies may have a reduced workload coupled with changing nutrition in the grass and a drop in temperature, it’s important to ensure that you are giving them the best diet possible.

 

Lisa Elliott MSc provides some essential guidelines to help you to supply the best nutrition for a horse or pony with PPID.

Provide Suitable Forage


Horses and ponies with PPID should be managed in a similar way to those prone to laminitis. They will often have reduced insulin sensitivity leading to Insulin dysregulation and an increased risk of laminitis, so need a diet that is low in starch and sugar all year round.

 

Grass intake may need to be restricted even through winter to minimise sugar levels, but they will need to be fed an alternative form of forage such as hay or haylage to keep the digestive system functioning well.

 

Ideally, hay or haylage should be offered on an ad-lib basis as its digestion creates internal heat, helping to keep horses and ponies warm from within, which is particularly important through the autumn and winter seasons.

Forage should be low sugar and starch so it’s always good to have it analysed, to keep track of sugar and starch levels within the diet. A typical analysis will show WSC (water soluble carbohydrates or simple sugars plus fructan), ESC (ethanol soluble carbohydrates or simple sugars minus fructan) and starch.

 

ESC is important for PPID horses and ponies with insulin dysregulation as it’s these simple sugars plus starch which need to be kept to a minimum.

 

Ideally, ESC + starch should be less than 10%. Some very sensitive horses can also benefit from having lower WSC levels in the diet, and for these it is often best to avoid turning them out onto frosty grass, waiting until the temperature rises above 5°C before letting them graze.

 

It is generally recommended that horses with PPID be fed forages with no more than 12% NSC (Non-Structural Carbohydrates) which encompasses simple sugars and fructan, plus starch.

If the NSC of the forage is above 12%, soaking is often recommended to reduce WSC (water soluble carbohydrates) but some research has shown that it can be ineffective in reducing it to a safe level.

 

Steaming hay has some great benefits, particularly in the winter to avoid carrying heavy buckets of cold water and has shown some reduction in WSC which could make it useful for a hay whose NSC is only just over the safe level.

 

Alternatively, feeding specifically produced low NSC (<12%) forage or replacing up to 25 per cent of the forage with oat straw or a low starch and sugar straw-based chop can be really useful to help manage PPID.

Manage Body Condition


Horses with PPID can often lose body condition so it’s important to manage this by adding in extra calories when needed to help with weight gain.

 

Cereals should be avoided as they are high in starch. Highly digestible fibre such as unmolassed beet, along with oil sources such as linseed, are great as they add extra calories for improved condition but are very low in starch and sugar, to help minimise the risk of laminitis.  

Whilst most horses and ponies with PPID lose weight, some can be overweight which will increase the risk of insulin dysregulation and potentially laminitis.

 

Monitoring weight and fat pads regularly is, therefore, essential and is easily done using a body condition scoring chart (BCS). Overweight horses and ponies can be managed with a low calorie, forage-based diet to help them lose weight.

 

This can be fed alongside a high specification balancer or supplement to supply a full range of essential micronutrients but without excess calories, which is important for horses and ponies with PPID.

Additionally, overweight horses and ponies can benefit from strategic rugging. Avoiding over rugging, keeping rugs to a minimum and leaving ponies unrugged (providing they have a good natural coat), during winter can really help with weight management.

Provide Quality Protein


Good quality protein is an important consideration for horses and ponies with PPID as they can often lose muscle mass.

 

Most horses with PPID are also older individuals who have a lower rate of muscle protein production, meaning that they need improved quality protein for muscle maintenance and repair.

 

Amino acids provide your horse with the building blocks for making good-quality protein.

 

Linseed, soya, alfalfa, and peas all have an excellent  amino acid profile, so look for feeds containing these.

 

Alternatively, provide a high specification balancer or supplement with good levels of essential amino acids, such as Lysine and methionine, to help facilitate the production of muscle protein to help rebuild muscle mass and integrity.

Deliver Antioxidant Support


Research has suggested that horses with PPID may have a higher level of oxidative stress in their body, to which potent antioxidants like Vitamin E might offer support.

 

Preserved forage such as hay, for example, can be quite in low vitamin E and can lose nutrients if soaked to reduce the starch and sugar content.

 

Consequently, it’s good to make sure you are delivering good levels by feeding a nutritious balancer, supplement or a feed suitable for horses with PPID, which supplies a good specification of essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Supply Essential Fatty Acids


Research has suggested that horses with PPID may have a higher level of oxidative stress in their body, to which potent antioxidants like Vitamin E might offer support.

 

Preserved forage such as hay, for example, can be quite in low vitamin E and can lose nutrients if soaked to reduce the starch and sugar content.

 

Consequently, it’s good to make sure you are delivering good levels by feeding a nutritious balancer, supplement or a feed suitable for horses with PPID, which supplies a good specification of essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Support Digestive Health and Immunity


Hindgut microbes are critical to the health of your horse because they help keep the digestive tract healthy, but are also involved in immunity.

 

Immunity normally drops in horses with PPID, making them more vulnerable to certain health issues and disease, so it’s important to try and boost it.

Yeasts can help re-build and promote the growth of beneficial hindgut microbes to support overall immunity and health so look for feeds and supplements containing these for optimum benefits.

Subscribe to our free newsletter for the latest hoof care news and updates

Ask a FormaHoof Expert Facebook Group

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business. Nevertheless, the course is open to everyone and owners can gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started.

Contact form

Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


Comfort Horses With PPID Or Cushing’s Syndrome & Laminitis

Providing comfort to horses with PPID or Cushing’s Syndrome & Laminitis

Aletia Reilingh FormaHoof

Aletia Reilingh

Canadian Farrier and FormaHoof Expert Aletia Reilingh is based in Borken, Germany, and works together with several local vets and clinics to support the treatment of a wide range of hoof-related diseases, injuries, and other common problems with FormaHoof.

 

Aletia recently worked with the Equine Clinic of Dr. Ulrich Mengeler on several cases, one of which involved a 20 year old retired Welsh Section A Pony, called Mounty, who is suffering from chronic laminitis in combination with PPID.

 

When Mounty was first presented at the clinic, x-rays were taken and the pony’s owner, veterinarian, and FCA Aletia Reilingh discussed the option to use FormaHoof as a supportive treatment. All three agreed that FormaHoof was a beneficial treatment option, which would provide Mounty with enhanced comfort and a better quality of life to enjoy his retirement.

Aletia shares the details of this case, outlines Mounty’s treatment for laminitis, his progress and answers some essential questions on laminitis in horses, equine Cushing’s disease and PPID.

 

Pre-FormaHoof diagnosis


Firstly, the care team reviewed the Mounty’s x-rays before progressing with his treatment:

“The x-rays showed a change in the coffin bone often associated with laminitis. We were able to clearly see that the sole at the point of the coffin bone was very thin, which was causing significant discomfort to the pony.”

FormaHoof was first applied on July 28th 2021.


"The results were remarkable, with the pony instantly returning to near full soundness, especially on hard surfaces!"

Play Video

After 6 weeks a new set of FormaHoof was applied and it was clear that the Mounty had experienced significant changes in his hooves, behavior and the degree of lameness between the application cycles.

Play Video

Mounty was significantly sounder and was able to move quite comfortably on a variety of surfaces. This enabled him to participate in horsemanship learning with the family’s children, going for walks and enjoying daily grooming, which he loves!

How many FormaHoof cycles are expected to be required before the pony can return to barefoot?

“It looks like we will need two more cycles before he can return to barefoot, as his feet grow very slowly.”

What additional treatments did the pony receive?

“Meds, clipping etc. He is on medication specifically for the management of his Cushing’s.”

Update: October 21st 2021


Play Video

Update from Mounty who’s happily enjoying the turnout.

Is Cushing’s disease in horses related to laminitis or founder?


Not directly, but various studies have shown that up to 50% of horses with Cushing’s are affected by laminitis.

 

Laminitis has been associated with abnormal insulin levels and causes extreme painful inflammation in horses’ hooves.

 

Laminitis is considered to be both an early sign and an advanced sign of PPID.

Why is FormaHoof a good solution to support horses and ponies’ PPID treatment?


As mentioned above, horses and ponies can be affected by a combination of PPID and laminitis – both can be a sign for each other.

 

FormaHoof is uniquely suited to treating laminitis as it encapsulates the damaged hoof, providing instant protection and support for the sensitive internal structures.

FormaHoof helps support relief and recovery from laminitis associated with PPID in the following ways:

Due to decreased immunity, horses and ponies with PPID can sometimes be more susceptible to hoof infections and abscesses, which can be extremely painful. FormaHoof helps to promote a clean, dry environment, helping to keep out harmful bacteria that can lead to abscesses and working as a preventive measure for several hoof pathologies.

More Facts about PPID AKA Cushing’s syndrome/disease

What is Cushing’s Syndrome?


Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) or equine Cushing’s syndrome or disease is an endocrine or ‘hormonal’ disorder that occurs in over 20% of aged horses, ponies, and donkeys.

 

It’s a complex condition associated with abnormal function of the pituitary gland which becomes over active and often enlarged, producing produces large amounts of several hormones including adrenocorticotropin hormone or ‘ACTH’.

Which horses are likely to get PPID?


Whilst senior horses are more likely to develop PPID and it is rare in horses less than 10 years old, horses and ponies of any breed or age group may be affected. However, breeds that struggle with obesity and high insulin concentrations are more likely to develop equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), which can predispose them to PPID.

What are the early signs of equine Cushing's syndrome?


  • Decreased athletic performance
  • Change in behaviour
  • Abnormal fat depots (patch development)
  • Loss of topline
  • Infertility
  • Laminitis

What are the advanced symptoms of Cushing's disease in horses?


  • Blindness and other neurological deficits
  • Abnormal sweating
  • Recurrent infections
  • Abnormal hair coat (long and curly), including a lack of seasonal shedding
  • Skeletal muscle atrophy
  • Rounded abdomen
  • Excessive urination and thirst
  • Laminitis

How do I know if my horse has Cushing’s disease?


It is highly advisable to contact your vet if you notice any of the above signs of PPID.

 

Your vet will carry out a blood test, which can often be as simple as testing for resting levels of ACTH. In many countries, horses can qualify for free PPID testing (e.g. UK, Canada).

Is Cushing's disease in horses curable?


Whilst there is no cure for PPID, by providing the right nutrition, care and support, alongside appropriate veterinary treatment, you can help mitigate its effects and keep your horse or pony sound, happy and healthy for many years to come.

What are the treatments for Cushing’s disease in horses?


Cushing’s or PPID is a life-long, degenerative condition, but can be managed with a daily dose of medication (tablet or paste form). Medication should be dosed and frequently controlled by a veterinarian.

 

Treatment should also include frequent blood checks to keep an eye on ACTH levels and keeping effective routines for hoof trimming, dental checks and worming is another important part of the overall treatment.

 

Horses and ponies with abnormal coat growth will also benefit from a regular clip to increase comfort levels.

Subscribe to our free newsletter for the latest hoof care news and updates

Ask a FormaHoof Expert Facebook Group

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business. Nevertheless, the course is open to everyone and owners can gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started.

Contact form

Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


Treating White Line Disease with FormaHoof

Treating White Line Disease With FormaHoof

Aletia Reilingh FormaHoof

Aletia Reilingh

Aletia Reilingh is Canadian by birth, a farrier by choice and a passionate dressage rider. 

 

Having made the move to Europe in 2014, Aletia became a state certified farrier in Germany and settled in Borken/NRW, servicing several areas in the Northwest of Germany and parts of the Netherlands. 

 

Aletia became one of the first FormaHoof Certified Applicators in early 2020 and is part of FormaHoof’s Expert Team, providing consultation services across the world. 

Malva’s White Line Disease Treatment


Malva is a 17 year old draught mare. She was presented to Aletia for treatment following a laminitis episode and subsequent severe white line disease in late September 2020.

 

After a hoof wall resection, FormaHoof was applied for a number of cycles over a short period of time. Her hooves were treated with copper sulphate and antibacterial spray before FormaHoof was applied, to ensure the cleanliness of the resected areas.

 

Malva’s comfort level increased instantaneously when FormaHoof was applied. She could be turned out during recovery and remained sound throughout, with a successful and sound transition to barefoot in January 2021. 

Malva's hoof rehab pictures:


Malva at the first farrier visit/ pre hoof wall resection


Malva 18th September 2020 pre FormaHoof


FormaHoof Application over the resected hooves


Malva in January 2020 transiting successfully to barefoot


Aletia Reilingh comments:


“Malva’s feet were a disaster. Massive hoof cracks had developed right in the middle of her hooves and she was quite lame. We immediately recommended x-rays and worked together with a veterinarian to make a plan. Firstly the enormous hoof cracks needed to be resected and cleaned. 

 

FormaHoof provided structural support and a clean environment for the hoof to grow back healthy. She was immediately sound following the application and her hooves were able to grow back strong, healthy and infection free. After 3 applications Malva returned to barefoot and is now sound, comfortable and able to live her best life.”

 

White Line Disease - Short Facts

What is white line disease?


White line disease in horses is also known as seedy toe, hoof-wall disease, hollow wall, Candida, or onychomycosis. Characterised by invading or opportunistic bacteria or fungi which destroy hoof-wall tissue, white line disease can, if left untreated, affect the entire inner hoof wall, resulting in lameness, hoof wall separation and loss of stability of the entire hoof.
A healthy hoof acts as a barrier against invasion of these microorganisms, but in an unhealthy hoof cracks or fissures can allow the bacteria or fungi to enter and infection to set in.

Is white line disease the same as thrush?


No. Thrush is a bacterial or fungal infection of the frog and, in some cases, also of the heels. It is sometimes also referred to as stall rot. Thrush can happen all too easily in neglected hooves and is caused by inadequate hoof care, infrequent farrier visits, and damp, dirty ground or stall conditions. Thrush comes with a strong, rotten smell and tar-like efflux in the affected areas.

What is white line disease caused by?


Weakness in this area can be a result of mechanical stress (overgrown feet), a wet environment, cracks, chronic abscesses, or laminitis. The weakness leads to a breakdown of the white line, which allows dirt, debris, fungus and bacteria to invade the hoof and worsen the stress on the white line.

Is white line disease contagious?


No, white line disease is not contagious. It can appear on one foot, on two feet, or all four. Horse hoof diseases may affect some horses more than others.

How do you know if your horse has white line disease?


White Line Disease is characterised by a multitude of cracks or fissures in the hoof or hoof wall separation and is usually discovered by the farrier during routine hoof trimming or by a vet whilst undertaking a hoof examination.

 

Further signs of white line disease may be a powdery hoof wall or a hollow sound whilst tapping the outside of the hoof capsule. Most horses won’t show lameness in the early stages of the disease.

How do I treat white line disease?


If left untreated, white line disease can “eat” its way up the hoof wall, all the way to the coronary band. Progress can vary in the extent and depth of the infection and your farrier or vet will take the necessary measures accordingly. In most cases, a hoof-wall resection is needed, which means all three layers of the hoof wall and all infected material are removed.

 

Depending on the size of the resected area, the hoof may need support with a special type of shoe. In severe cases, the horse will need to take a break from training until the foot is more stable. The infected hoof needs to be kept as clean and dry as possible, to allow the foot to grow new, healthy hoof. A clean environment is key for the healing process, as the infection can recycle and even reappear in previously affected horses, even if the hoof walls have grown out strong.

New hoof - supporting healthy hoof growth with FormaHoof


FormaHoof provides instant, drug-free pain relief, stabilises resected areas, keeps medication in place, and allows the hoof to grow in a clean and controlled environment. With the support and encapsulation of the hoof, most horses can return to training in no time, as the application allows the horse to spread weight over the entire hoof and takes pressure off the wall.

The increased weight-bearing allows better blood flow to the entire foot, encouraging healthy hoof growth. FormaHoof gives owners, farriers, and vets peace of mind during white line disease treatment, with immense time savings and enhanced comfort for the horse.

 

Whilst traditional methods are time and care-intensive, FormaHoof applications allow contact hours to be reduced, for everyone involved in the treatment cycles.

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Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business. Nevertheless, the course is open to everyone and owners can gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started.

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The importance of comparing “apples with apples”

The importance of comparing “apples with apples”

By Alexander Papantoniou

Alexander Papantoniou

As CEO of FormaHoof, Alexander holds an undergraduate degree in Economics & Law and is an Alum of the Stanford GSB. He has spent most of his career as a successful tech entrepreneur, based out of the Middle East. He is a firm believer in creating passionate and driven teams, which led to the creation of the current FormaHoof executive organisation, all of whom have an equine background and a keen interest in improving equine welfare around the globe.

FormaHoof – a fundamental disruption in the equine world


FormaHoof, has always set out to be a fundamental disruption in the equine world. As a company, we did not however set out to claim that we are the replacement for all collective equine hoof care skills, we succeeded in creating a brilliant tool, that equine professionals may add to their offering and create a broader set of services and treatment options for their customers.

As with many other disruptive products, FormaHoof has been plagued by a series of misconceptions about what it does, and how it works and it is our firm belief that after a very successful year of growth (we are now (Feb 2021) present in 45 countries globally) it is time to set the record straight on some of the most common ones.

Misconceptions about FormaHoof


First and foremost, FormaHoof has no current comparative product. The proprietary LFM (Liquid fit moulding) technology was developed from the ground up to offer a brand-new mindset, include the latest materials and manufacturing technology, to create a completely new tool. It is neither a cast, nor a glue on. It will essentially rebuild a perfect hoof geometry (regardless of hoof condition), in a highly repeatable way. One of our earliest goals was to offer professionals a tool and a process that would be highly repeatable, which leads to standardisation of the results. You cannot have a bad day with FormaHoof.

Secondly, because of the unique ability the FormaHoof has to quickly conform to any irregularity in the hoof, it is a single tool that can apply to a multitude of conditions. The same mould can be used for treatments of laminitis, white line disease, hoof cracks and many other hoof related and general injuries. Therefore, customers should be aware that the avenues to make a return on investment on a mould (or a kit) are far more than any other available product on the market. This same principle applies both to professionals doing applications, but also for owners that might want to have a mould for a particular horse. The end result is the same, stabilise the condition, stop further deterioration – start the recovery process.

FormaHoof application cycles, time and cost savings


With an average of 6 weeks (and in extreme circumstances up to 12 weeks) between application cycles, the horse resides comfortably in the FormaHoof, in a variety of environmental conditions, without intermediary visits from applicators. There is no need to change bandages, change shoes, adjust boots – the application itself does all the hard work. By limiting the number of visits within a treatment cycle, and also limiting the amount of materials that may go into a treatment cycle (medication, pads, shoes etc) overall cost of treatment is reduced. The logic is simple, you may pay 200 USD 10 times, or pay 300 USD twice – customers should be aware of the numbers of steps in a treatment and objectively evaluate, ensuring they are comparing “apples with apples”.

Exchanging experience and gaining FormaHoof insights


As a closing note, a final piece of advice. When seeking consultancy about FormaHoof, ensure that you consult with someone with the relevant experience. We are constantly investing in new communication channels where owners and applicators can share the right information. Do not accept comments from underqualified individuals, such as “it’s too expensive” or “it won’t work”, rather engage with someone qualified and ask for an objective analysis of your case. Then decide when you are fully informed. We have an increasing list of cases where owners were told that their horse was terminal, but with the right knowledge and skill, survived with the help of FormaHoof.

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business. Nevertheless, the course is open to everyone and owners can gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started.

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Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


Winter Hoof Health with FormaHoof

Winter Hoof Health with FormaHoof

by Lisa Elliott

Lisa Elliott

MSc Equine Science

FormaHoof E-Learning & Community Coordinator

Lisa has a BSc in Biology and an MSc in Equine Science with a passion for Equine Nutrition. She has over 20 years horse care and management experience, loves heavy horses and is a keen follower of Eventing.

Hoof health is essential all year round, but the changing seasons can have a significant impact on your horse’s hooves. In this seasonal blog post, we look at caring for the health and integrity of your horse’s hooves during potentially the most challenging season – winter. Environmental conditions such as wet, muddy, and frozen ground can have adverse effects on horse’s hooves so it’s important to try to protect them as best you can with the right care and prevention.

Nutrition

The right nutrition is crucial in winter and throughout the year to create strong, healthy hooves so it’s important to ensure your horse is receiving a balanced diet which supplies key nutrients:

Energy


Energy and Protein are the two most limiting nutrients for hoof health and growth and if they are not supplied sufficiently hoof quality will be poor. Ensuring the diet provides the right energy balance is, therefore, essential to maintain hoof integrity. A winter diet made up of good quality forage should ensure energy needs are met well, but if your horse is working harder, additional feed may be needed to provide sufficient calories to maintain good energy levels.

Protein


Protein is vital for healthy hoof formation all year round.  Hooves are made up of protein and keratin, a specialised sulphur rich protein which is the same protein responsible for our own hair and nails. Amino acids provide the building blocks for proteins so it’s important to ensure the diet provides these. 

There are 10 essential amino acids (including the 3 major limiting amino acids, Lysine, methionine, and threonine), which horses are unable to make themselves and need to be supplied as part of a fully balanced diet. Methionine in particular is a key part of good hoof structure and formation because it provides a source of sulphur, which is essential for producing keratin. Methionine can also be used to produce the sulphur rich amino acid cysteine, which along with cystine is also vital in hoof horn formation.  Good dietary sources of protein in winter include good quality hay and haylage, linseed meal, alfalfa, and chia seeds. Good quality protein can also be supplied through a high specification balancer or hoof supplement.

Biotin and the microbiome


Biotin is one of the most well-known nutrients when it comes to good hoof health. This sulphur rich B Vitamin is a vital for the production of Keratin for strong, healthy hoof horn and has a key role in tissue growth and maintenance.  Biotin and other key B Vitamins for hoof health are actually produced through fermentation of forage by the microbes in your horse’s hindgut. 

 

Ensuring your horses hindgut microbes are happy and healthy will help them  produce all the essential B vitamins your horse needs. A compromised microbe population won’t be able to do this, so it’s important to ensure they are supported through the right nutrition.  A diet rich in varied forage can help develop a healthy microbial population, alongside pro and pre-biotics to support and nurture beneficial gut microbes.

 

Research has shown that providing around 20mg of Biotin daily can help hooves to strengthen and grow but to be fully effective it needs to be provided with other nutrients such as methionine and zinc. Biotin and its co-nutrients can be

provided through a good balancer or hoof supplement, but it is important to be aware that hoof horn  can take 9 to 12 months to grow down fully from the coronet band, so horses with poor hoof quality will need to be fed it all year round.

Vitamins and Minerals


There are a number of vitamins and minerals with vital roles within hoof health and formation. Essential minerals include zinc, copper, manganese, sulphur and calcium which all have a structural role within the hoof wall and support cell function and proliferation for optimum hoof growth. Vitamins A, E, C, and the B vitamin niacin are also important for hoof health and integrity. A balanced diet consisting of good quality, varied forage fed alongside a good balancer or hoof supplement will help ensure you provide your horse with all these essential micronutrients.

Omega 3 fatty acids


Fats play a pivotal role because they retain the natural moisture and pliability of the hoof wall, resist the absorption of water from the environment and prevent bacteria and fungi from entering the hoof horn all of which is essential during winter. Fats contain both Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, but horses need a higher level of Omega 3 fatty acids for optimum health. Omega 3 fatty acids have numerous benefits associated with their anti-inflammatory properties and help support strong, well growing hooves. Good sources of Omega 3 fatty acids include fresh grass but when this is lacking in winter, they can be provided through linseed meal or oil.

General winter Hoof Care

Although hoof growth is generally slower in winter, regular visits from qualified hoof care professional are still essential to optimise hoof health.

Always make sure your horse’s hooves are checked for abrasions and cracks and picked out regularly to remove mud and other debris. If your horse is stabled for long periods over the winter, pick out any wet bedding and ensure this is kept clean and dry to help prevent infection and thrush. If your horse is shod, snow can often ball up in the sole so this should also be removed when necessary.

The hoof is believed to be strongest when it has a stable moisture content of 25%. However, this is difficult to maintain, especially in wet winter conditions. When the hoof is exposed to excessive amounts of water, moisture floods the hoof structures, weakening the hoof horn. Wet conditions can also cause the hoof wall to expand and contract allowing bacteria to invade the capsule, where they can multiply and produce a painful abscess. Additionally, cold, icy weather can mean paddocks will freeze, causing the ground to become extremely hard and result in bruising to the soles of the horse’s feet. Most common winter related hoof problems can be avoided with FormaHoof.

Why use FormaHoof in winter?

FormaHoof has been tested in sandy deserts, over rocks and mountains to the snowy alps and provides proven benefits to your horse during winter month. FormaHoof can provide much needed protection as part of a winter hoof care regime to help combat the many challenges of winter.

The unique application means the sole and hoof capsule are protected and supported when the ground is hard, helping horses to cope better in tough, frozen conditions. FormaHoof protects your horse’s hooves from absorbing large volumes of water whilst creating a clean, moist environment where the hoof can stay naturally hydrated and maintain a healthy moisture balance, helping to keep common winter conditions like thrush, cracks and abscesses at bay.

FormaHoof winter tips


In particularly snowy and icy conditions, the Traction application is perfect for providing excellent grip. Studs can be added directly into the application for even more grip if needed.

Storing your FormaHoof Advanced Polymer correctly, at room temperature, prior to the application process is key to a successful winter application.

Snowballs appear as snow when the warm hoof touches the ground and re-freezes when touching the cold metal of the shoe. FormaHoof imitated the perfect natural barefoot and is non-metallic, whilst snowballs are a problem for horses with shoes there are no snowballs building up in a FormaHoof application.

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business. Nevertheless, the course is open to everyone and owners can gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started.

Contact form

Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


Cotterel Polo Farms – A farm at the cutting edge of polo training

Cotterel Polo Farms
A farm at the cutting edge of polo training

Featured article at Polo Times, UK (February 2021)

Cotterel Polo Farms is using FormaHoof applications to provide extra comfort and protection to a number of horses on the farm. Working closely together with FCA David Andrade from Diamond C Farrier Service, a long-term partnership was found with the mission to give maximum comfort to the ponies.

About Cotterel Polo Farm

Owned and managed by polo couple Jennifer “Jenny” Luttrell Benardoni and husband Francisco Benardoni, Cotterel Polo Farms is a year-round competitive tournament Polo organisation. A medium-goal season is run over the summer where players enjoy well-nourished, pristine pitches, thanks to the region’s ‘semi-arid’ climate. After the summer season, the horses travel to compete in the competitive winter season in Indio, CA where the Cotterel team has had a long standing presence on the California circuit. The Cotterel team also operate their own breeding and training program and in recent years has developed an exciting collaboration with the Valiente Polo organization in Argentina, led by Adolfo Cambaiso and managed by Roberto Zedda. In recent years, the Benardoni’s have further developed the Cotterel facilities into one of the most secluded polo ranch destinations in the USA, offering on site lodging for both human and horse. Three brand new polo fields, 160 stall stabling, exercise track and a breath-taking onsite, 25 room luxury lodge which has been expertly renovated from the original two story barn historically used for working draft horses in the 1920s, welcome teams and players alike for the summer months to train and compete, with the facilities and support to achieve their best polo season yet. Jenny and Francisco are meticulous in the preparation for the sport. Nothing is left to chance and no stone is left unturned to ensure the best preparation of the horses on the farm and recently Jenny and Francisco have implemented a new solution to common hoof issues to improve horse performance from the ground up: FormaHoof.

FormaHoof Traction - Maximum protection, support and grip for sport horses

We are all familiar with the unfortunate but sadly accurate phrase, ‘No foot, no horse’. Foot welfare is so important across all equine disciplines, including polo. To focus on this pivotal area we caught up with Formahoof and Cotterel Polo to see how problem feet might be treated. FormaHoof is a liquid-fit, reusable mould system that offers a highly effective and easy to apply solution to every hoof care challenge, from laminitis and white line disease to thin soles, collapsed heels or conformation, developmental and poor hoof performance issues. Cotterel’s ranch manager, Francisco discovered FormaHoof when looking for a solution to the many hoof-related issues the farm faced on a weekly basis. Francisco comments, “We utilise mainly thoroughbred-type horses, many of which experience on-going hoof-related issues and we were constantly looking for something to try to keep them comfortable. I found FormaHoof and I immediately reached out to find a farrier in our area who used the products. We met David from Diamond C Farrier Services, showed him some of the hoof issues we were dealing with and he was confident that our horses would thrive with FormaHoof. He was right. Horses that walked up lame, walked out sound almost immediately!” “The first Cotterel ponies to receive the FormaHoof were mainly those that had serious, diagnosed hoof issues,” said owner/ player Jenny Luttrell Benardoni. “One of our homebreds, Panamera, suffered a laminitic event that left her with excessive damage in the right hoof when she was three-years-old. We turned her out for a year and a half with no training or riding because she was not sound until we found Formahoof. With the first application, she was sound and we were able to put her right back into work. Within a period of 10 months we were able to finish breaking and training her to play polo. She is now in her first competitive polo season here in Indio.” Although Cotterel found success with more serious hoof issues, the advantages were also evident when using the product on more common hoof issues. “It seems to us that by putting the horses at the correct hoof angles, plus the increased blood flow in the hoof leads to faster recovery times,” said Francisco. “We also put one of our homebreds, Moonshine, in FormaHoof to help heal a tendon issue. Within 12 weeks not only did we see an improvement in the tendon, but we noticed she developed bigger shoulder muscles than she had prior to her injury.” The Cotterel team continued to see great results in their competitive tournaments in California last Winter and expect the same in their summer polo operation in southern Idaho.

Download the full article here

 

For more information about Cotterel Polo visit their #FormaHoofEquestrian profile or website and social channels.

Join our Facebook group

The FormaHoof – Ask an Expert Q&A group was setup to create an open experience exchange between horse owners and professionals. Get your questions answered and learn more about FormaHoof in a familiar environment whilst making new friends on the way to healthier hooves.

Learn FormaHoof insights here

The FCA course in the FormaHoof Academy is set to give equine podiatry professionals the option of adding certified high-quality FormaHoof services to their business. Nevertheless, the course is open to everyone and owners can gain helpful insights in the usage of FormaHoof and learn with their trusted farrier, trimmer or vet, how to get started.

Contact form

Would you like to discuss your horse’s case with us? We’d love to hear from you.


FormaHoof Academy is Open for Enrolment!

FormaHoof launches online training academy to certify equine professionals

WATERFORD, IRELAND

Created by FormaHoof’s team of equine experts, the FormaHoof Academy gives farriers, vets and equine practitioners all the theoretical knowledge and practical insights needed to use FormaHoof to help their clients’ horses overcome a multitude of hoof related issues; from laminitis and white line disease to thin soles, collapsed heels or conformation, developmental and poor performance issues. Even if you’re not an equine professional but are simply looking to expand your knowledge and to fully understand the benefits and application process of FormaHoof for your horse, you can still benefit greatly from the 3-part course.

FormaHoof CEO Alexander Papantoniou comments

“2020 was a difficult year for many industries around the world. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic made face-to-face contact impossible in many situations and for an emerging technology such as FormaHoof, the challenge arose to develop a methodology that would allow for the rapid upskill of new applicators across the globe, in a consistent and sustainable fashion. We needed a system that allowed applicators to be able to complete training on their own terms and in their own time, taking into account the busy schedule of vets and farriers and so we are delighted to launch the FormaHoof Academy.”

 

“When we started the FormaHoof certified Applicator (FCA) program, we knew that combining it with the FormaHoof Academy certification would add an extra layer of security for owners purchasing a FormaHoof service, because they would have assurances that the applicator had completed a formal training that is properly assessed by experienced FormaHoof technical consultants.”

Our FCA’s are our partners


Our FCA’s are our partners in equine hoof care around the world; skilled applicators that are helping their client’s horses overcome a multitude of hoof related issues, from laminitis and white line disease to thin soles, collapsed heels or conformation, developmental and poor performance issues. Through the FormaHoof Academy, the skills and knowledge of these applicators are formally recognised, official certification achieved, and access gained to expanded FormaHoof possibilities, from additional bonus material to enhanced promotional support for our FCA’s own local businesses.

If you are a horse owner or stable manager, perhaps your own farrier would be keen to learn more and to become FormaHoof certified? We would be happy to get in touch with them and answer any questions they may have, so please feel free to share this information, or send us their details and we can get in touch.

Filmed in real time


The FormaHoof Academy has been filmed in real time on actual customer horses, to ensure that the experience is as authentic as possible. Covering the basics of a FormaHoof application from start to finish (including trimming techniques), the Academy also discusses best practices for treatment of common hoof problems with FormaHoof. Techniques for business development and customer acquisition are also addressed in the Academy program, giving you the know-how you need to grow your business.

Who should apply


Access to the Academy is open to everyone with an interest in learning FormaHoof techniques, but completion of the Academy assessment and full certification as a FCA requires submission and approval of proof of professional business. All applicants should have fundamental hoof care skills as the FormaHoof Academy is geared toward the transference of FormaHoof best practices and not general farriery techniques.

 

The fee for the FCA course is EUR 99 + VAT, which covers the costs of the core online training, the certification process and the assessment. Our team of experts will continue to add modules to the e-learning environment in the future, many of which will be free of charge to Academy students. New specialist courses on topics such as White Line Disease and Foal Conformation abnormalities and treatments are also in development, to give graduates in-depth knowledge of these specialist areas and which will be available to purchase separately.

 

The cost of purchasing a Starter Kit (or any initial quantity of moulds) is not included in the Academy fee. However, upon successful registration to the course, participants shall receive a discount code for their first purchase.

Recovery journey with FormaHoof from loss of hoof capsule

Recovery journey with FormaHoof after the loss of the hoof capsule

BY HORSE OWNER LILLIE AND FORMAHOOF CO-FOUNDER ROBERT STEVENSON, AUSTRALIA

Robert Stevenson FormaHoof

Robert Stevenson

GRAPHIC WARNING!
This article may include images that shock, offend or upset you.

 

Robert, a farrier with many decades of experience in equine podiatry and hoof care and has worked and consulted in some of the most prestigious equine organisations and centres around the world.

 

Muffin suffered from a loss of circulation to the lower leg as a result of a tourniquet situation created by a feed bag getting twisted around his leg. The bag cut off the circulation to the area which resulted in enormous damage and ultimately the loss of the hoof capsule.
Once the hoof capsule sloughed off, Muffin was unable to bare any weight at all on the leg and Lillie, his owner, was advised to have him put down.

“I just couldn’t make that decision as I wanted to give him some time and a chance to survive. Once the hoof started to cornify, Muffin could start to put limited weight on the ground and very slowly the hoof started to grow down from the coronary band. I took him to the vet again for X-rays to see what was going on and once again was told to put him down because the recovery and rehabilitation process would be too long.”

 

“I was devastated, but by chance was tagged in a post on Facebook about FormaHoof and thought it looked fantastic. It took a while for me to decide to go ahead not knowing if it would work or not. But I decided to give it a go.”